Published on: 08 May 2018 09:54

Written by: Dawn Burns

 

Ever wondered about the legacy of Black heritage in Scotland? Or thought about how the slave trade or colonisation influenced contemporary demographics in Scotland? This course will provide an all-telling opportunity for young people to learn about this history!

We will provide lectures, walking tours, site visits and seminars facilitated by CRER.

You will also be offered workshops on programming, curation, equipping you with the knowledge and guidance to programme your own film screening as part of the Africa in Motion Film Festival and Black History Month 2018 programme.

This course will be coordinated by Africa in Motion Film Festival (AiM) in collaboration with The Coalition of Racial Equality and Rights (CRER).
You will also be offered workshops on programming, curation, equipping you with the knowledge and guidance to programme your own film screening as part of the Africa in Motion Film Festival and Black History Month 2018 programme.
This course will be coordinated by Africa in Motion Film Festival (AiM) in collaboration with The Coalition of Racial Equality and Rights (CRER).
**Deadline for expression of interest – Friday 25 May 2018**
APPLY HERE:   goo.gl/forms/F4BzRPu01yJ97Vo62
Course dates:
Induction and Introduction to Black History in Scotland – Weds 6 June
Walking tour, workshops and introduction to curation – Thurs 7 June
Curation Day – Thurs 21 June
Supported self-exploration and research – July
Programming Day – Weds 8 August
Programme Lock-down – Friday 31 August
Marketing – September / October (two days per month TBC)
Programmed events to take place between 26 Oct – 4 Nov

Reviving Scotland's Black History 2017:
Events curated during the 2017 Reviving Scotland's Black History programme included the ‘Vanishing Sail’ curated by Elizabeth Williams who looked into her Caribbean heritage. The film is set on the tiny island of Carriacou, West Indies, the film follows the last wooden sailboat builder who dreams of saving a great tradition passed down the generations from Scottish settlers that sailed their centuries ago. The screening was followed by a Q&A with producer Justin Sihera, and a Caribbean club night with DJ Yemster. Alysha Somani (who has Tanzanian heritage) programmed the Tanzanian film ‘T-Junction’ looking at muslim communities Dar-es Salaam, this event was followed by chai and mandazi (Tanzanian doughnut). This event attracted a lot of Swahili speaking groups, and had an attendance of over 70 people in total. Elias Tekle an Eritrean refugee chose to programme an Eritrean comedy, ‘Debbas’, for the men’s community group in Maryhill Integration Network. The final event, The Transatlantic Slave Trade Acknowledged, curated by Ailsa Cole, was a very well attended event (over 100 people in total) that examined the transatlantic slave trade and its continued effects. It took place in St John’s Church and we screened two films including the Scottish production ‘1745’ and ‘The Crying Conch’. The screenings were accompanied by a panel discussion on the legacy of the slave trade and its continued effects with Steven Mullen and Geoff Palmer.

Funded by BEMIS Scotland via the ‘2017 Year of History Heritage and Archaeology’. This is a partnership between BEMIS Scotland and the Scottish Government to facilitate diverse, multicultural celebrations.